Tracey Barnett

Project Title
Developing a Better Assessment of Hookah Use among Young Adults

Role
Principal Investigator

Michael Moorhouse PhD, Co-Investigator

Funding Agency
National Institutes of Health; National Cancer Institute

Funding Period
September 2012 – September 2014

Abstract
The potential for acceptance of tobacco products, addiction, and multiple tobacco product use is a significant public health threat. There has been a tremendous increase in hookah use among young adults. Hookah research thus far has contributed to prevalence rates among adolescents and young adults; the knowledge of harm in use; and perceptions of lack of harm. However, no known studies have investigated reasons for use, and outcome expectancy theory provides a framework for assessing positive associations as reasons for behaviors. Therefore, using outcome expectancy theory, we will conduct focus groups with young adult hookah users to ascertain their positive and negative outcome expectations. From an iterative data analysis methodology, we will develop themes from these focus groups and then an item pool of questions to assess hookah use. These questions will be discussed and further refined by an expert panel; experts in both hookah use and outcome expectancy theory. Finally, we will pilot test a survey instrument to 400 hookah users at the University of Florida. We will use the pilot data to also conduct a confirmatory factor analysis to validate the instrument.

Keywords
Hookah, Tobacco, Outcome Expectancy Theory, Item Response Theory, Young Adults

NCI announcement: http://cancercontrol.cancer.gov/grants/abstract.asp?ApplID=8402267


Project Title
Use, Attitudes, and Knowledge of Waterpipe Tobacco Use at the University of Florida

Role
Principal Investigator; Barbara Curbow PhD, Christopher McCarty PhD, Scott Tomar DMD Co-Investigators; Steven Pokorny (Alachua County Public Health Department) Co-Investigator

Funding Agency
University of Florida Opportunity Fund

Funding Period
July 2009 – June 2011

Abstract
The proposed project will establish the prevalence of waterpipe usage among University of Florida students employing a random selection intercept sampling approach. During the survey phase of the project, waterpipe behaviors will be explored, as well as perceptions regarding the popularity and harmfulness of waterpipe. In the second phase of the project, identified waterpipe users will complete a social network analysis detailing their use of waterpipe in terms of location, frequency, duration, and social context. Understanding reasons for this method of tobacco use can lead to prevention and intervention programs to dispel the myths associated with the safety of this product, and to decrease its prevalence among adolescents and young adults.

Keywords
Hookah; waterpipe; tobacco use; college students